Cryotherapy for Weight LossMedical Recovery

Doctor Oz on Cryotherapy

Dr Oz Demonstrates Cryotherapy

Who is Dr. Oz

After graduation from Harvard University, Oz went on to jointly earn an MBA from The Wharton School and an MD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Oz proved himself to be an exceptional surgeon, becoming a specialist in heart transplants and minimally invasive procedures. Early in his career, he treated a patient whose family would not allow a blood transfusion for religious reasons. Though the encounter initially upset him, it eventually led Oz to broaden his approach to healing. “I began to recognize that as dogmatic as I thought I could be with my knowledge base, there were certain elements of the healing process I could not capture,” he said in a Life Extension magazine interview. The experience led him to seek out alternative treatments and combine them with Western medical practices.

In 1994, Oz established the Cardiovascular Institute and Integrative Medicine Program at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Media exposure followed, and with his wife he co-authored the book Healing from the Heart: A Leading Surgeon Combines Eastern and Western Traditions to Create the Medicine of the Future, which was released in 1998. The couple teamed up again to create Second Opinion With Dr. Oz, a television show that brought the surgeon’s medical expertise to an even wider audience during its sole season in 2003. His guests included Charlie Sheen, Magic Johnson, Patti LaBelle, Quincy Jones and Oprah Winfrey.

Wikipedia – Who is Dr. Oz?

Dr Oz Cryotherapy

Not All Alternative Therapies Are Good For You. In Fact, Some Can Put Your Health In Danger. Dr. Oz Separates The Ones That Help, From The Ones That Hurt, and Here Specifically it's Dr. Oz on Cryotherapy-Which he deems Helpful, and Legitimate

Short Answer; Cryotherapy Helps

Dr. Oz on Cold therapy, does it work?

Dr. Oz Demonstrates Cryotherapy
Dr. Oz Uses Cryotherapy

Whole body cryotherapy (WBC) is a safe, pain-free treatment that cools the exterior layer of skin with sub-zero blasts of air for up to three minutes.

During your treatment, your body will activates several mechanisms that promote significant, long-term benefits, both medical and aesthetic.

MUSCULOSKELETAL BENEFITS

Pain Management – The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of cryotherapy can drastically improve the effects of muscular and joint disorders such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and other conditions.

Athletics – WBC improves workout recovery time and enhances performance by immediately reducing muscular inflammation

Post-Surgery Recovery – WBC is recommended for post-surgery usage to expedite recovery and manage inflammation and pain.

Check out this Article on why Professional Athletes are adopting Cryotherapy 

METABOLIC & HEALTH BENEFITS

WBC causes the body to turn up its metabolic rate in order to produce heat. This effect allows you to ‘burn’ 500 — 800 Kcal for several hours following the procedure. (We think you might like this article on How Cryotherapy helps with Weight Loss)

After multiple treatments, the metabolic rate increase tends to last even longer. WBC also triggers the immediate release of endorphins, which can improve mood disorders with their analgesic properties. This treatment also improves immune functions and promotes overall health by reducing internal inflammation.

SKIN HEALTH BENEFITS

The anti-inflammatory properties of cryotherapy are used to treat chronic skin conditions (psoriasis, dermatitis, etc.) and improve skin elasticity, tone, and texture by:

Increasing the production of collagen in deeper layers of the skin (similar to laser treatments on the face, where very hot temperatures are used)

Stimulating the vasoconstriction and vasodilation of vessels and capillaries in the skin, which allows toxins and other stored deposits to naturally flush out

Dr. Oz on Cryotherapy
Dr Oz Does Cryotherapy

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